Effect of visual searching task on the postural stability of children

Authors

  • Carina L. Moreira UNESP - Sao Paulo State University, Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Sciences, Bauru, SP, Brazil; Post-graduation Program in Movement Sciences, São Paulo State University – UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Leandro F. Oliveira UNESP - Sao Paulo State University, Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Sciences, Bauru, SP, Brazil
  • Matheus B. Brito UNESP - Sao Paulo State University, Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Sciences, Bauru, SP, Brazil; Post-graduation Program in Movement Sciences, São Paulo State University – UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Sérgio T. Rodrigues UNESP - Sao Paulo State University, Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Sciences, Bauru, SP, Brazil; Post-graduation Program in Movement Sciences, São Paulo State University – UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Paula F. Polastri UNESP - Sao Paulo State University, Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Sciences, Bauru, SP, Brazil; Post-graduation Program in Movement Sciences, São Paulo State University – UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil - [email protected] https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2007-5950

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20338/bjmb.v15i2.201

Keywords:

Eyes movements, Development , Postural control, Working memory, Gaze performance

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The relationship between gaze behavior and postural stability under distinct cognitive loads is still unclear in children.

AIM: This study focuses on eye movements' effect on the children's postural stability by varying the visual tasks' attentional/cognitive demands.

METHOD: Twenty young adults (23.4 years-old, ± 2.1) and sixteen children (10.3 years-old, ± 0.4) stand in semi- tandem position on a force plate, wearing a head-mounted eye-tracking while performing three 40 second-trials in the following order: stationary gaze task; free-viewing task; and visual searching task.

RESULTS: Children showed a higher number of fixations during the stationary gaze task (p<0.0001), but this number was lower during free-viewing (p<0.004) and visual searching tasks (p<0.0001) when compared to young adults. Total fixation duration was lower in children than in young adults (p<0.0001) and higher during stationary gaze task than free-viewing (p<0.0001) and visual searching tasks (p<0.0001) for both groups.

CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the performance of the visual searching task during the maintenance of a challenging stance may deteriorate children’s postural stability suggesting that the relationship between gaze behavior and postural control is not well developed around the age of 10 years.

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Published

2021-06-01

How to Cite

Moreira, C. L., Oliveira, L. F., Brito, M. B., Rodrigues, S. T., & Polastri, P. F. (2021). Effect of visual searching task on the postural stability of children. Brazilian Journal of Motor Behavior, 15(2), 79–90. https://doi.org/10.20338/bjmb.v15i2.201

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